eRodMedia Esteban Rodriguez and Media
newyorker:

A 1937 cover by Constantin Alajálov. For more Christmas covers from our archives: http://nyr.kr/1fWNMzt

newyorker:

A 1937 cover by Constantin Alajálov. For more Christmas covers from our archives: http://nyr.kr/1fWNMzt

atmystyle:

Pumpkin Sweet Swirl Buns

stoweboyd:

A recent resurgence of the ‘is Social Business dead?’ meme bubbled over this week in a post by Chris Heuer, and smelling the bacon grease I ran toward the fire, offered up an analysis, and announced a new project, at the same time:

an excerpt

Social business isn’t dead, but it has become tired. It’s not longer even an edgy and emotive alternative to business-as-usual, and partly because of the half he [Heuer] gets wrong or never examines: today’s tools for social business. The world of business has moved ahead to accepting the class of contemporary technologies that embody the slightly better 2013-style of collaborative business, dominated by work management tools from Microsoft, Salesforce, IBM, Jive, and other established enterprise software vendors. To the extent that those tools and the practices that surround them define the social business, then they have become commonplace, not a profound redefinition of working together in new ways.

• What is needed, though, is not a retreat to arguing about the term social business, but a movement forward, a movement embodied as a community of people committed to advancing new principles of learning, organization, leadership, and management, pushing forward into a new future of work. •

In  writings more recent that the January piece Heuer pointed to, I have made a strong case for the following trends, supported by a wide range of research here at GigaOM and other firms:

  1. C-level executives hope to gain another round of productivity from new technologies and practices that are grouped under the loose rubric of ‘social’.
  2. They believe that the mechanisms used in the past — demanding more work from employees, and routinization of work practices — cannot be used again, at least not to get any serious gains.
  3. The answer — if that is a question — is for organizations to adopt a new form factor for business, one that undoes the rules and loosens the ties that make businesses slow to learn, innovate, and respond.
  4. One of the toolsets to apply in this quest for the fast-and-loose business are ideas about working socially and tools to support that. However, the greatest advances are likely to be more closely linked to fundamentals of organizational culture, and the relationship of the individual to work and the organization, rather than a social business breakthrough, per se.
• To the extent that social business was a concept that a community of practitioners hoped would represent or spark a radical break with the past, it has fallen short. •

Perhaps, then, I could restate Heuer’s apocalyptic statement into something more practical and pragmatic: social business isn’t dead, but it isn’t enough, either. And simply getting the meaning of the term straightened out — if such a thing is possible, at this point — won’t add much, either. At the best, there are a set of ideas derived from the social revolution on the web — like pull versus push communication, and the benefits of defaulting to open, not closed, communication — that can be productively applied to make working socially easier and faster.

What is needed, though, is not a retreat to arguing about the term social business, but a movement forward, a movement embodied as a community of people committed to advancing new principles of learning, organization, leadership, and management, pushing forward into a new future of work.

To the extent that social business was a concept that a community of practitioners hoped would represent or spark a radical break with the past, it has fallen short. You can interpret that as a failure of the concept, or a sign of endurance of the mainstream notion of business, or perhaps even as a failed power grab by those most loudly advocating for ‘social business’-led change. But this does not mean that work isn’t changing, or that we do not need even more change — in our organizations and ourselves — in the months and years ahead. We do. It is essential to find new balance in a new normal, where the ground beneath our metaphorical feet is never steady and always shifting.

I am committed to help give such a movement a bit more definition, and in the following weeks I will be laying out some ideas about a loose community of people committed to the investigation of the future of work. I am launching an effort to do that called Chautauqua, named after the adult education movement of late 19th and early 20th century America. I hope to work with local groups across the country and internationally to explore a topic central to the future of work each month, in a model stolen (honestly) from the Pecha Kucha and Creative Mornings movements.

You might want to read the whole piece at GigaOM Research, or visit the Chautauqua site and join up. 

comedynerdsunited:

Kumail Nanjiani’s first hour long special is really, really good you guys.

I hate to start off a review so informally, but it should be said right at the top. It’s an incredibly funny show, and writing about something this good without giving away any of the punch lines (if that’s your thing, Comedy Central has posted a couple of clips! Go check those out for some specifics!) is really difficult. I’ll be the first to tell you, writing from a place of anger or dissatisfaction is a lot easier than writing from a positive place, which is where I am after listening through Beta Male a couple of times. It’s a solid hour of genuine material from a genuinely funny person, and it was refreshing to listen to something so funny without resorting to being mean about things.

Full disclosure: I was able to see some of this material last year when Kumail and Jonah Ray brought their weekly LA based stand up show, The Meltdown, to NYC as a part of the New York Comedy Fest. The great news is all that material really holds up as part of a larger special and all of the material I hadn’t heard before is equally as great.

Kumail tells his stories in a really approachable way, while also remaining terribly interesting. His comedy is proof that you don’t have to directly relate to a story to find that story compelling. I don’t game (do we use game as a verb?) but his material about video games is some of the funniest stuff on the album because it comes from such a good place. Conversely, there are some things we all can relate to, because some experiences are universal: without getting too personal, I dare you to make it through some of the bits about porn without nodding your head at least once.

Beta Male premieres on Comedy Central on July 20th at midnight. It will be available for purchase on July 23rd, but if you’re super jazzed about it already you can pre-order it on amazon.com right now.

CNU Editor Sarah has seen exactly one episode of Franklin and Bash. She tweets here.

Got that? Conservatives’ failure with women this year was not the natural reaction to a mountain of tone-deaf legislation attacking their rights, and not even the result of President Obama’s own considerable appeal, but instead happened because ill-informed women were unable to resist the supernatural charms of George Clooney and Sarah Jessica Parker. And this, fellow Americans, is why The Clooney must never fall into enemy hands.
The Maddow Blog’s Kent Jones, mocking the “explanation” offered by American Talibaner Ed Vitagliano of why Romney lost the election. (via diadoumenos)
retrofitcomics:

Gray is Not a Color by Sally Madden shipping in late december, now available for pre-order.  

retrofitcomics:

Gray is Not a Color by Sally Madden shipping in late december, now available for pre-order.  

collegehumor:

Screencap - Thanks for the advice Google Maps
Honey, what kind of condition is that kayak in?

collegehumor:

Screencap - Thanks for the advice Google Maps

Honey, what kind of condition is that kayak in?

popculturebrain:

Trailer: ‘A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III’ - Feb 8

Directed by Roman Coppola, starring Charlie Sheen, Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman and Patricia Arquette.

scribnerbooks:

The 10 Best Books of 2012 from The New York Times Book Review, including our own Andrew Solomon’s powerful, groundbreaking FAR FROM THE TREE: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity. Congratulations, Andrew!

Read an excerpt of Far from the Tree or watch the trailer here.